Tag Archives: right action

Soulbyte for Monday March 30, 2020

In changing times let not the self get lost in its vicissitudes, its patterns of behavior, or its old ideas but keep it primed and ready. Train it to trust in the changing times as the new path, as the gateway to change that is necessary, bringing down that which is no longer viable and replacing it with that which is sustainable for a new age. In such times a warrior knows how to act, with loving kindness for self and other, the old and the new alike, for a warrior knows that everything matters, but a warrior also know that only that which is most necessary and important moves forward into new life. Stay strong, and in the warrior’s way, stay loving and kind too.

Sending you all love,

The Soul Sisters, Jan & Jeanne

Soulbyte for Thursday February 6, 2020

Maintain your own good values, your own true reality, even as the world around you loses its fixation on what is right and prosperous, and for the greater good of all. Do not let the actions of a few undermine the hearts of the many. Remain on the path of light and love, no matter what prevails, for light and love will always be the right answer.

Sending you light and love,

The Soul Sisters, Jan & Jeanne

Soulbyte for Friday October 18, 2019

When the time to act comes, be decisive. Decisiveness comes only through becoming aware of what is right and what is not. Study yourself, know yourself deeply and fully so that when a moment of decision arrives you will immediately know and do what is right, without thinking, without hesitation. Learn who you are and why you are there, alive in this moment and time, so that you may know what matters to you, and especially so that you may find your true path of heart and always know its call. In knowing all that, decision making and right action become second nature and you will have freed up your energy for more important causes.

Sending you love,

The Soul Sisters, Jan & Jeanne

Chuck’s Place: Injured Maybe, Offended Never

Never get offended…
– Photo by Jan Ketchel

When it really matters, when we are really threatened, something in us seizes control and acts. Awareness of the acts we perform in this heightened state of awareness may instantly be lost to memory as we shift back to our ordinary state of awareness, like when an intense dream is immediately forgotten upon awakening.

Immediately upon shifting out of these non-ordinary states of reality our internal dialogue takes charge, filling our minds to the brim with the affairs of everyday life, as our just moments ago extraordinary adventures fade into oblivion. In psychoanalytic language, our internal dialogue delivers us to a full blown neurosis. A caricature of how it operates would be a Woody Allen/Doubting Thomas character whose mind incessantly ruminates, doubts, and judges both self and others.

The salient feature of this obsessive thinking is its fixation upon feeling offended by the actions of others or blaming the self for the way things are; in effect, feeling offended by one’s own actions and limitations.

That we all have an internal dialogue is a necessary fact of life. In fact, as the Shamans of Ancient Mexico point out, its incessant defining and judging functions allow us to interpret and navigate the solid world we live in. However, the debilitating side of this nonstop chatter in our minds is that it distracts us from our capacity to live a richer life in a state of heightened awareness.

Indeed, we can be injured by the intentional actions of others, but to attach to the constant  promptings of the internal dialogue, to be offended by the behavior of other or self, is to relegate the lion’s share of one’s energy to inconsequential, emotional self-defeat. Put bluntly, it’s a major waste of energy.

We needn’t obsess to address real occasions of injury, for as previously stated, when needed, something within us will spring forth and act without the necessity of lengthy deliberation. Even the action of freezing, or leaving one’s body under the impact of violent attack, reflects instinctive knowing of how best to survive. The internal dialogue is of no value when it really counts.

Shamans recommend freeing oneself from spending one’s energy on feeling offended. The energetic savings accrued by this allows one to gain greater access to living in a richer state of heightened awareness, where one enjoys, and is fully present to, all that is possible in life.

Don Juan Matus calls this state the mood of the warrior, where one is fully energetically alive in each moment in a state of inner silence. Pragmatically, this entails refusing the promptings of the internal dialogue to attach to any interpretations of being offended, and responding instead to the actual presenting needs of each moment.

The thinking mind might have a role in deliberating a decision, but silence allows the truth of the heart to spark spontaneous right action. This is living in the Tao of heightened awareness.

The best guidance for freeing oneself from the energy drain and limiting perspective of the internal dialogue is to allow it to just be, to not engage it, to not argue with or fight against it. Rather than be offended by life, particularly in this time of great offensive talk, respond like a warrior who acts from the place of what is truly needed to survive and prevail, in the best interest of all.

Yes, acknowledge that the acts of others can injure you, and do take decisive action to protect the self whenever necessary, but don’t waste any energy on being offended by the acts of others, as the internal dialogue would have you do.

Finally, place no attachment on the outcome of your decisive actions; fulfillment is already achieved in the purity of the warrior’s decisive act.

Without offense,

Chuck